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Here is a question I hoping someone can answer, or perhaps we can all brainstorm up an answer.

Something I've noticed about custom dolls is they are not kid friendly, meant for display only.  I don't think there is anything wrong with that, but I personally think that makes them harder to sell.  I think many parents would love to get a custom doll for their child, but not if their kid can't play with it.  Meanwhile, adult collectors don't seem to be scrambling to pay $40+ for a custom doll when they could put that money towards an original.

So, how can we make custom dolls more kids proof?  Has someone discovered a way to keep a face-up from completely rubbing away?  Let's share some ideas and not take "It just can't be done" as an answer.

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Using a plastic bonding paint is probably the first step. I have struggled with this myself, most plastic bonding paints only come in basic colors & those that do are tacky on vinyl. From there it is a matter of making them playable.

I usually use a kryolan sealer before Mr. Super Clear to make the sealant a bit more powerful. Also I use Testor's paint and liquitex acrylic as they're both a little sturdier than like the powder pastels and colored pencils. Just make sure the dolls don't get too wet, keep them out of dust while they dry.

i play with my Customs and they seem okay? 

Yeah, Im not sure how to kid proof ones with a full body repaint but ones with a hair and face change hold up pretty well though Ive never done too much with their hair after I get it in the style I want. All I really have to do is glue the hair to the inside of the head like they do with the factory dolls and seal the face. The only problem I can see is that I'm not sure whether the materials on the finished product are toxic or not.

Always check your paints first for toxicity, that's an important rule.

I've been experimenting with using dry-brushing techniques to modify the base vinyl paint colors I can find. So far I have not had any problems with it flaking off (& I handle the dolls a lot while making the outfits & finishing the face-ups).

What is dry-brushing?

Gabby Goyle (2) said:

I've been experimenting with using dry-brushing techniques to modify the base vinyl paint colors I can find. So far I have not had any problems with it flaking off (& I handle the dolls a lot while making the outfits & finishing the face-ups).

dry-brushing is when you dip the brush (or application device - I've used paper towels before) then wipe off the majority of the paint onto a towel, plate, or something clean before you apply the paint to your doll (or object you are painting). I picked up the technique painting miniatures for playing D&D (Dungeons & Dragons) when I was younger.

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