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She says she picked'r up. Can't see the pics too well, but eh.

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My friend in Tennessee grabbed me one! I am so happy! All I need now is Skull Shores Frankie.

Phantom nerd here- see my icon? ;)

In Leroux's book he's born disfigured, but you are right- still just a man.  The burnt by flames or acid didn't come till the 40's version with Nelson Eddy and was repeated again in the Hammer horror version and several following incarnations. (In the Paradise version it's a record press)

There were never any true elements of the supernatural in the original.

However- the Phantom is considered to be a "classic monster".  Though, the term monster can be and is frequently applied to humans.

P.S.  I LOVE Cupids spine wings.  I'm trying to be picky about which dolls I get- but this may be the deciding point :)

Witchbaby said:

Erik, or the Phantom of the Opera was never a monster, as written in the original novel by Gaston Leroux. He was a horribly disfigured man (from being burned), who was a prodigy in music. Andrew Lloyd Webber based his musical on the book, not the movie monster from the 20's. Hollywood turned Erik into a monster. But I'm going to agree with both people. Chaney really turned the Phantom of the Opera into one of the most iconic movie monsters from that era. I am extremely angry that Mattel turned Operetta into an "Opry" star. That pretty much disgusts me. If anything I was truly hoping for her to be French with a gorgeous flowing ball gown, or something of that sort. Something refined. Not some country singer. That is a slap in the face to Leroux's original work, plus it Americanizes her in an awful way. She should be French, not American in any way, shape, or form. I'm anxious to read the box and see her in person. I want to buy her, as I've been a fan of anything Phantom since I was a child, but there are some versions of the Phantom of the Opera that truly undermines the brilliance of the man behind the mask. 

Heather said:


In the book which came before either of those he is just a creepy man in a mask as well.  Hollywood may have made him a monster, but he never was originally.  At least not in the sense we are using it here.

Starla Zombabe said:

BUT The Phantom of the Opera is considered one of the early Hollywood Monsters.

Watch the original movie from the 20s and he was more than a man in a mask!  He was a undead ghostly ghoul that haunted a theatre. He did wear a mask, but to hide his disfigured phantom face.

NEW Hollywood, with the introduction of the Musical, have tamed him into a deformed musician who wears a mask to hide his scars.

Eeeek! Zirofax, nice one! Thanks for catching my mistake. You're absolutely right. :) He's born disfigured. Sorry about that. Oh! Did you ever Phantom by Susan Kay? It's a massively huge novel that spans Erik's entire life. It's beautifully written. In that version Erik is also born disfigured. I think I was thinking of Kay's version and was like "Naaa. I think it's different in the original novel." Lol! >.br/>
Zirofax said:

Phantom nerd here- see my icon? ;)

In Leroux's book he's born disfigured, but you are right- still just a man.  The burnt by flames or acid didn't come till the 40's version with Nelson Eddy and was repeated again in the Hammer horror version and several following incarnations. (In the Paradise version it's a record press)

There were never any true elements of the supernatural in the original.

However- the Phantom is considered to be a "classic monster".  Though, the term monster can and frequently is applied to humans.

P.S.  I LOVE Cupids spine wings.  I'm trying to be picky about which dolls I get- but this may be the deciding point :)

Witchbaby said:

Erik, or the Phantom of the Opera was never a monster, as written in the original novel by Gaston Leroux. He was a horribly disfigured man (from being burned), who was a prodigy in music. Andrew Lloyd Webber based his musical on the book, not the movie monster from the 20's. Hollywood turned Erik into a monster. But I'm going to agree with both people. Chaney really turned the Phantom of the Opera into one of the most iconic movie monsters from that era. I am extremely angry that Mattel turned Operetta into an "Opry" star. That pretty much disgusts me. If anything I was truly hoping for her to be French with a gorgeous flowing ball gown, or something of that sort. Something refined. Not some country singer. That is a slap in the face to Leroux's original work, plus it Americanizes her in an awful way. She should be French, not American in any way, shape, or form. I'm anxious to read the box and see her in person. I want to buy her, as I've been a fan of anything Phantom since I was a child, but there are some versions of the Phantom of the Opera that truly undermines the brilliance of the man behind the mask. 

Heather said:


In the book which came before either of those he is just a creepy man in a mask as well.  Hollywood may have made him a monster, but he never was originally.  At least not in the sense we are using it here.

Starla Zombabe said:

BUT The Phantom of the Opera is considered one of the early Hollywood Monsters.

Watch the original movie from the 20s and he was more than a man in a mask!  He was a undead ghostly ghoul that haunted a theatre. He did wear a mask, but to hide his disfigured phantom face.

NEW Hollywood, with the introduction of the Musical, have tamed him into a deformed musician who wears a mask to hide his scars.

Oh and I love your profile pic! Also I'm so freaking excited for Cupid I can't stand it. I'm on the hunt for her!

Zirofax said:

Phantom nerd here- see my icon? ;)

In Leroux's book he's born disfigured, but you are right- still just a man.  The burnt by flames or acid didn't come till the 40's version with Nelson Eddy and was repeated again in the Hammer horror version and several following incarnations. (In the Paradise version it's a record press)

There were never any true elements of the supernatural in the original.

However- the Phantom is considered to be a "classic monster".  Though, the term monster can and frequently is applied to humans.

P.S.  I LOVE Cupids spine wings.  I'm trying to be picky about which dolls I get- but this may be the deciding point :)

Witchbaby said:

Erik, or the Phantom of the Opera was never a monster, as written in the original novel by Gaston Leroux. He was a horribly disfigured man (from being burned), who was a prodigy in music. Andrew Lloyd Webber based his musical on the book, not the movie monster from the 20's. Hollywood turned Erik into a monster. But I'm going to agree with both people. Chaney really turned the Phantom of the Opera into one of the most iconic movie monsters from that era. I am extremely angry that Mattel turned Operetta into an "Opry" star. That pretty much disgusts me. If anything I was truly hoping for her to be French with a gorgeous flowing ball gown, or something of that sort. Something refined. Not some country singer. That is a slap in the face to Leroux's original work, plus it Americanizes her in an awful way. She should be French, not American in any way, shape, or form. I'm anxious to read the box and see her in person. I want to buy her, as I've been a fan of anything Phantom since I was a child, but there are some versions of the Phantom of the Opera that truly undermines the brilliance of the man behind the mask. 

Heather said:


In the book which came before either of those he is just a creepy man in a mask as well.  Hollywood may have made him a monster, but he never was originally.  At least not in the sense we are using it here.

Starla Zombabe said:

BUT The Phantom of the Opera is considered one of the early Hollywood Monsters.

Watch the original movie from the 20s and he was more than a man in a mask!  He was a undead ghostly ghoul that haunted a theatre. He did wear a mask, but to hide his disfigured phantom face.

NEW Hollywood, with the introduction of the Musical, have tamed him into a deformed musician who wears a mask to hide his scars.

Yeah, I really wish she were French too.  Is there some explanation for her being Southern?  It just doesn't make sense at all.

Witchbaby said:

Erik, or the Phantom of the Opera was never a monster, as written in the original novel by Gaston Leroux. He was a horribly disfigured man (from being burned), who was a prodigy in music. Andrew Lloyd Webber based his musical on the book, not the movie monster from the 20's. Hollywood turned Erik into a monster. But I'm going to agree with both people. Chaney really turned the Phantom of the Opera into one of the most iconic movie monsters from that era. I am extremely angry that Mattel turned Operetta into an "Opry" star. That pretty much disgusts me. If anything I was truly hoping for her to be French with a gorgeous flowing ball gown, or something of that sort. Something refined. Not some country singer. That is a slap in the face to Leroux's original work, plus it Americanizes her in an awful way. She should be French, not American in any way, shape, or form. I'm anxious to read the box and see her in person. I want to buy her, as I've been a fan of anything Phantom since I was a child, but there are some versions of the Phantom of the Opera that truly undermines the brilliance of the man behind the mask. 

Heather said:


In the book which came before either of those he is just a creepy man in a mask as well.  Hollywood may have made him a monster, but he never was originally.  At least not in the sense we are using it here.

Starla Zombabe said:

BUT The Phantom of the Opera is considered one of the early Hollywood Monsters.

Watch the original movie from the 20s and he was more than a man in a mask!  He was a undead ghostly ghoul that haunted a theatre. He did wear a mask, but to hide his disfigured phantom face.

NEW Hollywood, with the introduction of the Musical, have tamed him into a deformed musician who wears a mask to hide his scars.

Yes there is. When Opereta was small, her father and mother, living in France, had a job transfer of some sort to America. They lived in the French culture influenced New Orleans, where their little daughter deveolped a twang from growing up on the bayou
 
Heather said:

Yeah, I really wish she were French too.  Is there some explanation for her being Southern?  It just doesn't make sense at all.

Witchbaby said:

Erik, or the Phantom of the Opera was never a monster, as written in the original novel by Gaston Leroux. He was a horribly disfigured man (from being burned), who was a prodigy in music. Andrew Lloyd Webber based his musical on the book, not the movie monster from the 20's. Hollywood turned Erik into a monster. But I'm going to agree with both people. Chaney really turned the Phantom of the Opera into one of the most iconic movie monsters from that era. I am extremely angry that Mattel turned Operetta into an "Opry" star. That pretty much disgusts me. If anything I was truly hoping for her to be French with a gorgeous flowing ball gown, or something of that sort. Something refined. Not some country singer. That is a slap in the face to Leroux's original work, plus it Americanizes her in an awful way. She should be French, not American in any way, shape, or form. I'm anxious to read the box and see her in person. I want to buy her, as I've been a fan of anything Phantom since I was a child, but there are some versions of the Phantom of the Opera that truly undermines the brilliance of the man behind the mask. 

Heather said:


In the book which came before either of those he is just a creepy man in a mask as well.  Hollywood may have made him a monster, but he never was originally.  At least not in the sense we are using it here.

Starla Zombabe said:

BUT The Phantom of the Opera is considered one of the early Hollywood Monsters.

Watch the original movie from the 20s and he was more than a man in a mask!  He was a undead ghostly ghoul that haunted a theatre. He did wear a mask, but to hide his disfigured phantom face.

NEW Hollywood, with the introduction of the Musical, have tamed him into a deformed musician who wears a mask to hide his scars.

i pretty much need this doll. shes so cute! every store i have been to has been completely wiped out of anything monster high :( i hope after christmas i can have some luck :)

C.A. Cupid is in Las Vegas now. I just picked her up from the Eastern & 215 Walmart.

She is in San Diego, CA. I just bought her, 3 CAM packs, the Roadster, and the Vanity from the Murphy Canyon Walmart. They also have a bunch of Abbey, Spectra, Skull Shores and some basics.

Ditto!

kelly robinson said:

i pretty much need this doll. shes so cute! every store i have been to has been completely wiped out of anything monster high :( i hope after christmas i can have some luck :)

Yesterday I called a bunch of Wal-Marts.  Nada.  They said, "call back at 9pm."  Nothing.  They said, "call back at midnight."  Zip.  I tried calling first thing this morning.  Zilch.  Nobody has received any MH shipments in my city!

It's cool if you don't like Operetta, you're 100% within your right to, this is your opinion and I respect it.

BUT she isn't an Opry star, or country singer; don't assume because of her accent please, this is how stereotypes are created. She's into a style of music and fashion called Rockabilly- though because she's more monster themed I would say she's closer to Psychobilly which is just the horror-punk version of Rockabilly. Rockabilly and Country aren't really similar at all and can hardly be mistaken for one and the same.

And think about it, really think about it, at that age would you really want to emulate your parents to a tee? I mean Draculaura is a Vegan, loves pink, AND is best friends with a Werewolf (and dating one), things I'm sure the Count doesn't really approve of. We're all also very aware of how Lagoona and Gil's relationship was strained because of their parents approval. The point I'm making is these children aren't their parents and I think it's VERY realistic that Operetta isn't isn't a flowing ball gown in love with Opera and has gone to an "opposite" music and style, because let's face it when I was a teenager I know the LAST thing I wanted was to look like/act like my parents. She's rebelling, and I love it because I see a bit of me in her.

Mattel also released a "document from Monster High Records" saying that she is French but they moved New Orleans Louisiana when she was young- again a very believable trait since New Orleans has a "French Quarter" because of the large populace of French immigrants that had moved there in it's early creation. French-Americans exist, which is another thing I personally like about the doll as it shows that America is a great melting pot of cultures and ethnicities.

But, these are things I personally love about her as a fan of Monster High and Phantom of the Opera. As I said you are definitely within your right to dislike her, I just wanted to offer some food for thought C:

Witchbaby said:

Erik, or the Phantom of the Opera was never a monster, as written in the original novel by Gaston Leroux. He was a horribly disfigured man (from being burned), who was a prodigy in music. Andrew Lloyd Webber based his musical on the book, not the movie monster from the 20's. Hollywood turned Erik into a monster. But I'm going to agree with both people. Chaney really turned the Phantom of the Opera into one of the most iconic movie monsters from that era. I am extremely angry that Mattel turned Operetta into an "Opry" star. That pretty much disgusts me. If anything I was truly hoping for her to be French with a gorgeous flowing ball gown, or something of that sort. Something refined. Not some country singer. That is a slap in the face to Leroux's original work, plus it Americanizes her in an awful way. She should be French, not American in any way, shape, or form. I'm anxious to read the box and see her in person. I want to buy her, as I've been a fan of anything Phantom since I was a child, but there are some versions of the Phantom of the Opera that truly undermines the brilliance of the man behind the mask. 

Heather said:


In the book which came before either of those he is just a creepy man in a mask as well.  Hollywood may have made him a monster, but he never was originally.  At least not in the sense we are using it here.

Starla Zombabe said:

BUT The Phantom of the Opera is considered one of the early Hollywood Monsters.

Watch the original movie from the 20s and he was more than a man in a mask!  He was a undead ghostly ghoul that haunted a theatre. He did wear a mask, but to hide his disfigured phantom face.

NEW Hollywood, with the introduction of the Musical, have tamed him into a deformed musician who wears a mask to hide his scars.

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